Verizon, Time Warner will throttle speeds, restrict usage of repeat copyright infringers

Verizon, Time Warner will throttle speeds, restrict usage of repeat copyright infringers
By the end of this month, the new "six-strikes" Copyright Alert System will go live in the U.S.

Verizon and Time Warner have outlined their plans for repeat pirates, the first of the cable companies to do so.



Time Warner says they will warn subscribers through popup notifications and eventually restrict browsing by in-browser redirects. Verizon will notify alleged pirates via email and even voice mail, and will eventually throttle speeds.

Both companies are part of the Center for Copyright Information (CCI), which was started by the MPAA and RIAA with the major ISPs in America.

For Verizon, the process will be in three stages. The first two alerts will be via email/voice mail informing the alleged pirates that someone on their connection has been flagged for copyright infringements. In the second stage, a pop up is delivered to users who must read and confirm it before it goes away. After that, actual punishments are a possibility, with throttling of Internet speeds occurring. The throttling is temporary, says the ISP, being lifted after 3 days.

Time Warner will have similar first and second stages, but the punishment stage will completely restrict Internet access, leading users to a Time Warner landing page for a temporary period of time.

The CCI once again stressed the CAS is an education program at its core.

Written by: Andre Yoskowitz @ 17 Nov 2012 14:33
Tags
Verizon Time Warner MPAA RIAA CAS
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  • 12 comments
  • Mysttic

    So basically what this will do is educate the CEOs that piracy will still happen regardless of these restrictions and hopefully one day the US will stop wasting tax payer's $ over nickle and dimes.

    17.11.2012 22:06 #1

  • Semperfipal

    If your a customer of one of these ISP providers, will using VPN have any effect on their nonsense?

    "Do not underestimate the power of an enemy, no matter how great or small, to rise against you another day." - Atilla

    17.11.2012 23:11 #2

  • xtago

    No really as all data goes via their headend, that's why people still get picked up even if they use IP hiders and stuff.

    There's nothing you can do that will hide your IP or make it untraceable bar using someone elses connection.

    If you did try hiding your IP correctly you'd never get any packets of any kind thus making you disconnected from the net overall.

    It's part and parcel of using the net you have to be seen to be on the net and to be unseen means your not on the net.

    18.11.2012 06:23 #3

  • cyberpirate

    you know , it seems to me that this whole thing is getting out of hand , why buy a product from a company that does this , let the RIAA , the CCI and the MPAA pay their bills , people have turned into such sheep

    18.11.2012 09:41 #4

  • nbfreak2

    Like everything we will find a way around this and the game of cat and mouse shall never end....

    18.11.2012 10:28 #5

  • KillerBug

    Originally posted by xtago: No really as all data goes via their headend, that's why people still get picked up even if they use IP hiders and stuff.

    There's nothing you can do that will hide your IP or make it untraceable bar using someone elses connection.

    If you did try hiding your IP correctly you'd never get any packets of any kind thus making you disconnected from the net overall.

    It's part and parcel of using the net you have to be seen to be on the net and to be unseen means your not on the net.
    IP spoofing may not hide you, but a good VPN will...sure, the ISP will know you are connecting to a VPN if they are paying attention...they can even tell you are downloading or uploading a lot...but they won't know what it is; no way to prove that piracy is happening.

    Of course, this law is written in a way that violates constitutional rights anyway, so maybe just suspicion is enough.

    Originally posted by cyberpirate: you know , it seems to me that this whole thing is getting out of hand , why buy a product from a company that does this , let the RIAA , the CCI and the MPAA pay their bills , people have turned into such sheep Why buy a product from companies that support the RIAA/MPAA/ETC? Well, there are arguments on both sides of that...but as for buying the internet connection, there isn't much choice for most people. Where I live there is just Verizon Fios and Time Warner Cable...the only other internet option is Dish, and that sucks.


    18.11.2012 14:06 #6

  • trespass22 (unverified)

    Torrentfreak shows a video on this. The ISP's themselves are not looking for you. The RIAA and MPAA have hired a third party to find people downloading specific titles and alert the ISP who blindly believes it and sends out a notice.

    Using a VPN WILL protect you if they do not keep logs. There is no way to trace a person to the torrent site otherwise.

    18.11.2012 14:59 #7

  • Semperfipal

    Originally posted by KillerBug: Originally posted by xtago: No really as all data goes via their headend, that's why people still get picked up even if they use IP hiders and stuff.

    There's nothing you can do that will hide your IP or make it untraceable bar using someone elses connection.

    If you did try hiding your IP correctly you'd never get any packets of any kind thus making you disconnected from the net overall.

    It's part and parcel of using the net you have to be seen to be on the net and to be unseen means your not on the net.
    IP spoofing may not hide you, but a good VPN will...sure, the ISP will know you are connecting to a VPN if they are paying attention...they can even tell you are downloading or uploading a lot...but they won't know what it is; no way to prove that piracy is happening.

    Of course, this law is written in a way that violates constitutional rights anyway, so maybe just suspicion is enough.

    Originally posted by cyberpirate: you know , it seems to me that this whole thing is getting out of hand , why buy a product from a company that does this , let the RIAA , the CCI and the MPAA pay their bills , people have turned into such sheep Why buy a product from companies that support the RIAA/MPAA/ETC? Well, there are arguments on both sides of that...but as for buying the internet connection, there isn't much choice for most people. Where I live there is just Verizon Fios and Time Warner Cable...the only other internet option is Dish, and that sucks.
    My neighbor has been downloading audio and video files for years from different bittorrent providers. She used Peerguardian for a long time, and now with her running Vista, she uses Peerblock. She doesn't use a VPN and insists Peerblock protects her. I told her there is no guarantee that product will keep you safe from RIAA/MPAA or any of the contractors they hire to identify you. Anyway its falling on deaf ears. I think she will be unpleasantly surprised one day.

    "Do not underestimate the power of an enemy, no matter how great or small, to rise against you another day." - Atilla

    18.11.2012 18:07 #8

  • adre02

    Originally posted by KillerBug: Originally posted by xtago: No really as all data goes via their headend, that's why people still get picked up even if they use IP hiders and stuff.

    There's nothing you can do that will hide your IP or make it untraceable bar using someone elses connection.

    If you did try hiding your IP correctly you'd never get any packets of any kind thus making you disconnected from the net overall.

    It's part and parcel of using the net you have to be seen to be on the net and to be unseen means your not on the net.
    IP spoofing may not hide you, but a good VPN will...sure, the ISP will know you are connecting to a VPN if they are paying attention...they can even tell you are downloading or uploading a lot...but they won't know what it is; no way to prove that piracy is happening.

    Of course, this law is written in a way that violates constitutional rights anyway, so maybe just suspicion is enough.

    Originally posted by cyberpirate: you know , it seems to me that this whole thing is getting out of hand , why buy a product from a company that does this , let the RIAA , the CCI and the MPAA pay their bills , people have turned into such sheep Why buy a product from companies that support the RIAA/MPAA/ETC? Well, there are arguments on both sides of that...but as for buying the internet connection, there isn't much choice for most people. Where I live there is just Verizon Fios and Time Warner Cable...the only other internet option is Dish, and that sucks.
    Im pretty sure if someone is sucking down 5gb a day, they would obviously know that you were pirating something. Even if you had some legal streaming account with someone, they could get those records and see that you were not using it at that time.

    This is superman

    19.11.2012 23:18 #9

  • adre02

    If everyone would boycott the music and movies then they would be forced to do something. I understand that amazon and netflix has provided an avenue but that is poor at best.

    When will they realize that it is about wanting to share what ever we want to share without penalty.

    This is superman

    19.11.2012 23:22 #10

  • bhetrick

    Originally posted by adre02:

    When will they realize that it is about wanting to share what ever we want to share without penalty.
    So you're saying that you want theft to be legalized?


    23.11.2012 11:23 #11

  • xboxdvl2

    Originally posted by bhetrick: Originally posted by adre02:

    When will they realize that it is about wanting to share what ever we want to share without penalty.
    So you're saying that you want theft to be legalized?

    no i think hes saying if you own something you should be able to make a digital copy of it and give away digital copies of it.

    i have the big screen tv,a ps3 and im gonna surround sound to go with it soon hopefully.car still runs smooth and computer still works but its a bit outdated.

    23.11.2012 17:15 #12

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