U.S. ISPs should pay for piracy, group says

U.S. ISPs should pay for piracy, group says
Anti-piracy firm CEG TEK has suggested that Internet Service Providers in the United States should pay fines when subscribers repeatedly commit copyright infringement.

It made the suggestion to the U.S. Copyright Office as part of its consultation with the public on copyright issues. Among its suggestions is a proposed $30 fine to be dished out to an ISP each time a subscriber is caught committing piracy. The fine would apple after an initial warning.



CEG TEK seeks settlement from Internet users it alleges to have infringed copyright of its clients, usually an adult entertainment company. These requests are sometimes forwarded to the alleged pirate by an ISP, but most large providers have chosen not to.

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) does not require that ISPs forward all copyright notices and settlement requests to their subscribers. CEG TEK would rather that the U.S. move to a model that is more like that of Canada.

"Canada's ISPs forward such notices at no charge to copyright owners. Setting up forwarding systems is relatively easy and inexpensive, and is similar to ISPs normal bill-forwarding systems," the company argued, reports TorrentFreak.

"By statute require ISPs to pay copyright owners $30 for each notice of claimed infringement sent with respect to an Internet account having repeat infringements... Do this, and ISPs would actually enforce their own Terms of Use that currently give lip service to the concept that customers are forbidden from engaging in copyright infringement."

Written by: James Delahunty @ 14 Apr 2016 4:46
Tags
piracy Ceg Tek US Copyright Office
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  • 12 comments
  • ivymike

    How about we stop all this punitive bullshit and institute a tax on blank media? #problemsolved

    14.4.2016 09:23 #1

  • scorpNZ

    Thought there was on all media,i recall it first began when cd's appeared & the fear of the music industry,so a certain amount was built into each cd & was paid to the industry.Great way to get money for nothing

    http://www.afterdawn.com/guides/
    http://www.realmodscene.com/

    14.4.2016 15:41 #2

  • KillerBug

    LoL... Quote: The fine would apple after an initial warning Quote: require ISPs to pay copyright owners $30 for each notice of claimed infringement
    In the last month, Google got 88 MILLION takedown notices...now someone wants to make a law that pays the trolls $30 per notice? I realize that google would be untouchable...just pointing out that there are already so many takedown requests that it is obvious that they are not being investigated by those issuing them or those receiving them, now someone wants to pay $30 per notice issued by bots, often against content that is not even affiliated with those issuing the requests...and those should basically bypass the ISP's and go straight to consumers who would have no way of proving their innocence?

    I have a better idea...the ISP's should integrate VPN service with rolling IP addresses and no logs into their service packages so that they would be unable to comply with all notices, thus saving themselves and the public from the trolls.


    Originally posted by ivymike: How about we stop all this punitive bullshit and institute a tax on blank media? #problemsolved Some countries do that...but then the guy who puts pirated music on his phone is unaffected, and the ARTIST that burns 1,000 copies of something he created himself has to pay the price. If you got a speeding ticket because someone else was speeding, how would that make you feel? If you knew that by speeding, the only risk was that someone else might get a ticket, how fast would you drive?

    14.4.2016 17:52 #3

  • gbswales

    I would have thought, given all the publicity in recent time, that anyone who is still risking downloading copywrite materials will likely be using a proxy or some kind of tunnelling program. How therefore are the ISPs going to be able to know what people are downloading in the first place. The proposak of introducing a media tax is no longer an option unless you are going to put the tax on hard drives. The majority of people innocent of doing any wrong would be paying the tax to support greedy corporations and I don't think that would go down well. If I break into a jewellery store by throwing a bric through the window - should brick manufacturers pay a fine?
    It is in my view up to these corporations to deal with this themselves and not by asking someone else to do it for them. They should also be compensating their artistes for proven losses. It is ridiculous to assume that every downloaded track equals a lost sale - I suspect in most cases the pirates would not pay for the musicc but just forgo most of it

    16.4.2016 03:42 #4

  • Digmen1

    I would rather that the ISP's spent their time banning people that send out obvious scams eg notices about my bank from Cnina or Russia or Nigeria.
    Or beautiful girls that want to come to my house that have never even met me.
    Or million dollar lottery wins from Google, or Microsoft.

    16.4.2016 05:21 #5

  • Not_buying_it

    Thinking along those same lines, why not make the ISP pay for any damage or data recover required from getting a virus. I think the VPN with roving IP's and no log keeping is the best idea yet.

    16.4.2016 12:42 #6

  • adre02

    I have 10 to 15 amateur mma fighters I spar with. How about each time an anti piracy cuck tries something of this nature they are made to step into a closed room with one of us for 5 min. I would love the conversation piece.

    This is superman

    17.4.2016 02:04 #7

  • bhetrick

    So I guess the alcohol brewers should be fined every time someone is caught over the legal blood-alcohol limit.

    So I guess the car mfr's should be fined every time someone is caught driving without their seatbelts.

    So I guess the cell phone mfr's should be fined every time someone is texting and driving.

    So I guess the gun mfr's should be fined every time a gun is used in a crime.

    .....

    17.4.2016 08:54 #8

  • adre02

    Originally posted by bhetrick: So I guess the alcohol brewers should be fined every time someone is caught over the legal blood-alcohol limit.

    So I guess the car mfr's should be fined every time someone is caught driving without their seatbelts.

    So I guess the cell phone mfr's should be fined every time someone is texting and driving.

    So I guess the gun mfr's should be fined every time a gun is used in a crime.

    .....
    Not the best or accurate examples but point well taken.

    This is superman

    17.4.2016 09:27 #9

  • Vancouversailor

    Prior to the internet being opened up first to schools and then to the general public, it was owned and dedicated to use by the US military. The TCP protocol as well as many other features were designed to overcome or bypass any obstacles, for example in the event of a nuclear attack where it would serve as a backup communications system.
    I have yet to see any successful attempts, by government or others, to introduce 100 percent effective censorship program. That includes the Chinese and Iranians who deploy thousands of cyber warriors in attacks on western systems and in attempts to block what their citizens can read.
    If some hick whores down in Texas think they can accomplish what governments fail to do, I'll take my hat off, if they should succeed..

    17.4.2016 15:45 #10

  • qazwiz

    Originally posted by KillerBug:
    LoL... Quote: The fine would apple after an initial warning

    I understand the LOL but really not funny. besides, it's ther wrong fruit... after all this is going PEAR shaped not apply shaped


    Originally posted by ivymike: How about we stop all this punitive bullshit and institute a tax on blank media? #problemsolved
    Originally posted by KillerBug:
    Some countries do that...but then the guy who puts pirated music on his phone is unaffected, and the ARTIST that burns 1,000 copies of something he created himself has to pay the price. If you got a speeding ticket because someone else was speeding, how would that make you feel? If you knew that by speeding, the only risk was that someone else might get a ticket, how fast would you drive?

    taxes taxes taxes, since "everybody" is doing it, why not institute a breathing tax?

    (sad part is there are people who will be thinking about trying that sarcastic idea)



    qazwiz is qazwiz everywhere. If you see me say HI!

    19.4.2016 14:08 #11

  • CarpeSol

    I can't believe these people were allowed to incorporate. As if people suing for copyright on defunct properties wasn't bad enough, now you have "copyright monetization firms"?

    This is beyond retarded and will only end up penalizing innocent people. If something like this actually went forward, smaller ISP's would get hammered, and whichever providers were left afterwards would all cost more.

    How do these parasites sleep at night? The sheer arrogance of believing they have the right to assault the national information structure like this.

    How far is this from straight up censorship like what they have to deal with in China?

    Make no mistake people...piracy is not the problem here.

    21.4.2016 23:36 #12

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